NHPCO MLC 2017 Pre-Conference Seminars

National Hospice and Palliative Care Management and Leadership ConferencePhoto courtesy NHPCO website
National Hospice and Palliative Care Management and Leadership Conference

Photo courtesy NHPCO website

NHPCO | April 28, 2017

2017 MLC Pre-Conference Seminars

Saturday, April 29, 2017
1:00 ‐ 5:00 pm
PC1: Community‐Based Palliative Care: Getting Started
Jean Acevedo, LHRM, CPC, CHC, CENTC, Acevedo Consulting, Inc, Delray Beach, FL
Judi Lund Person, MPH, CHC, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA
Sue Lyn Schramm, MA, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA
Judith Skretny, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA
This fast‐paced and interactive program is for anyone who is beginning or thinking about beginning a community‐based palliative care program. Program delivery models will be discussed, as will the basics of conducting an organizational needs assessment. Participants will learn about Medicare Part B billing and coding and receive direction on creating a business plan.
Learning Objectives:
  • Describe two models and locations of palliative care service delivery
  • List three basic elements of a successful needs assessment
  • Discuss Medicare B reimbursement for palliative care services

CE/CME Credits: Nurse, Physician, Social Worker

Sunday, April 30, 2017
8:30 am ‐ 5:00 pm (includes morning refreshments and lunch)
PC2: Community‐Based Palliative Care: Making It Work
Jean Acevedo, LHRM, CPC, CHC, CENTC, Acevedo Consulting Incorporated, Delray Beach, FL
Lori Bishop, RN, BSN, CHPN, Sutter Health, Fairfield, CA
Jeanne Dennis, MSW, Corridor, Yonkers, NY
Elizabeth Fowler, MPH, Bluegrass Care Navigators, Lexington, KY
Suzi Johnson, MPH, RN, Sharp HospiceCare, La Mesa, CA
Steven M. Lancman, MBA, BSE, Penn Medicine Homecare and Hospice Services, Philadelphia, PA
Robert Parker, RN, MSN, CENP, CHPN, Interim Healthcare Inc, Lockhart, TX
Sue Lyn Schramm, MA, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA
Judith Skretny, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA
Mary Jo Vetter, DNP, RN, AGPCNP-BC, New York University, Rory Meyers College of Nursing, New York, NY
This seminar will provide a deep‐dive into strategies for making community‐based palliative programs a success. Participants will learn approaches to contracting for revenue sources beyond Medicare Part B, the importance of developing quality metrics that matter to payers and what accreditation can add to a community‐based palliative care program. There will be an opportunity to learn successes from programs that have been successful in sustaining and growing community‐based palliative care services.
Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss the importance of quality‐based data for a community‐based palliative care success
  • Describe two revenue sources for palliative care beyond Medicare Part B
  • List two “best practices” when providing community‐based palliative care services

CE/CME Credits: Nurse, Physician, Social Worker

Sunday, April 30, 2017
9:00 am ‐ 4:30 pm (includes morning refreshments)
Diane Deese, CACPFI, EMT, VITAS Healthcare, Chicago, IL
Guillermo Escalona, MDiv, Miami Cancer Institute/BHSF, Miami, FL
Deborah Mizell, RN, BS, VITAS Healthcare, Lauderhill, FL
Richard Payne, MD, Duke Divinity School, Duke University, Durham, NC
Joel Policzer, MD, FACP, FAAHPM, VITAS Healthcare, Miramar, FL
Joesph Shega, MD, VITAS Healthcare, Orlando, FL
Shirley Thimothee-Paul, RN, MSN, VITAS Healthcare, Fort Lauderdale, FL
There are populations who do not benefit from equitable access to quality end‐of‐life care because of a history of healthcare disparities. This workshop will provide participants the opportunity to work through the cultural and systemic issues, and the inherent biases that exist for underserved and LGBT
communities and communities of color. Using small group sessions, role play and other cutting‐edge interactive techniques, participants will acquire the knowledge and skills to help themselves and their programs develop care that brings equity out of disparity.
Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss the effects of healthcare disparities in various communities and the implications for end-of‐life care decision‐making
  • Review cultural imperatives and taboos to facilitate culturally appropriate care and prevent barriers to care
  • Discuss methods to overcome one’s own biases when caring for people from a community not your own

CE/CME Credits:  Counselor, Nurse, Physician, Social Worker

Sunday, April 30, 2017
9:00 am ‐ 12:00 pm (includes morning refreshments)
PC4: Hospice Regulatory Deep Dive ‐ Part 1
Judi Lund Person, MPH, CHC, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA
Jennifer Kennedy, MA, BSN, RN, CHC, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA
Hospice providers are a part of the larger healthcare community. As the landscape of the healthcare community is changing, how will hospices change and adapt? How does a hospice demonstrate value with the focus on value‐ based purchasing? What are the regulatory issues that hospices must
understand, implement and track? What regulatory changes apply to just hospice providers, and when is hospice included in regulations that apply to all Medicare provider types? With the change in the administration, what does that mean for hospice? This session will focus on the up‐to‐the minute
regulatory issues facing all hospice providers, with plain English discussions of requirements and expectations for implementation.
Learning Objectives:
  • List 3 new regulatory requirements that impact hospices and identify steps toward compliance
  • Discuss 2 components of value‐based purchasing and describe the data points necessary to “make the case” to Medicare, insurers and the public
  • List 4 components of the FY2018 hospice wage index proposed rule and list the impact of each component on hospice providers

CE/CME Credits: Compliance Officer, Nurse, Physician andSocial Worker

PC5: Stemming Hospice Facility Losses in an Era of Shrinking GIP Utilization
Sue Lyn Schramm, MA, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA
Robert Phillips-Plona, Hospice of the Western Reserve, Inc, Cleveland, OH
Apollo Townsend Stevens, LeHigh Valley Health Networth, Allentown, PA
Hospice facilities across the nation are showing signs of increasing distress. Facility lengths of stay are down. GIP days are down. Staffing woes are up. For even a modest‐sized facility, a significant drop in GIP billable days can easily mean the loss of more than $1 million a year in revenue.
NHPCO believes that the new era of tight regulatory oversight and scrutiny is here to stay, but there are many practical real‐world approaches that can stem losses from hospice facilities. In this seminar, you will learn from experts in the field who are meeting these challenges successfully with innovation and effective strategies to maintain facility revenue. This session will cover case studies from facilities that have successfully maintained both occupancy and revenue while documenting GIP appropriateness.
Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the root causes of shrinking GIP utilization
  • Name several methods for analyzing census and length of stay reductions at their own facilities
  • List practical, achievable methods for improving revenue at hospice GIP facilities

CE/CME Credits: Nurse

PC6: The Secret Sauces of Transformational Leadership
James A. Avery, MD, FACP, FCCP, FAAHPM, Hospice of the Piedmont, Charlottesville, VA
Jonathan Davis, FACHE, Martha Jefferson Hospital, Charlottesville, Virginia
Healthcare is undergoing a seismic change; hospice is right at the epicenter. But no one – except a wet baby – likes change. In this participatory seminar, we will demonstrate how every hospice clinical leader and hospice executive needs to ensure that hospice maintains its missional heart while, at the same time, changing and reinventing itself in response to a myriad of external and internal pressures. How? By developing transformational leaders. Learn the secret sauces of transformational leadership: storytelling, leading together and negotiation. Whether your hospice is large or small, for‐profit or non‐profit, rural or urban, this is a “must attend” session for every executive, leader and manager in hospice.
Learning Objectives:
  • Describe transformational leadership how it applies to staff positions at all levels
  • Demonstrate the elements of transformational leadership and how they drive change effectively
  • Develop skills in transformational leadership; identify what is important (to self and others), how to pursue both personal and organizational interests, and how to facilitate cooperation that leads to optimal solutions

CE/CME Credits:  Counselor, Nurse, Physician, Social Worker

Sunday, April 30, 2017
1:30 ‐ 4:30 pm
PC7: Hospice Regulatory Deep Dive ‐ Part 2
Judi Lund Person, MPH, CHC, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA
Jennifer Kennedy, MA, BSN, RN, CHC, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA
Carol Spence, PhD, National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA
In 2017, hospices will enter the new world of public reporting, as Hospice Compare is expected to begin. As the requirements for hospice quality reporting continue to grow, as new measures are added, and the focus on hospice quality increases, what are the steps that a hospice can take to ensure that quality care is provided as new measures are implemented? How will consumers and other providers use the published results in Hospice Compare? How can hospices ensure that they have the tools to monitor their quality reporting and conduct an internal analysis of quality measure compliance?
Learning Objectives:
  • List three components of the FY2017 Hospice Wage Index final rule that specifically apply to hospice quality reporting
  • Describe the 2 new hospice measures, the additions to the HIS discharge record and the composite measure component parts
  • Provide 3 details of Hospice Compare and the 4 steps a hospice must take in preparing for public reporting

CE/CME Credits: Compliance Officer, Nurse, Physician, Quality Professional and Social Worker

PC8: Developing Strategy for New Payment Models
Raymond Belles, BKD, LLP, Springfield
Cathy Hamel, MA, Gilchrist Services, Baltimore, MD
Zinnia Harrison, MHS, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation, Baltimore, MD
Cooper Linton, MBA, MSHA, Transitions LifeCare, Raleigh, NC
Bill Musick, BS, MBA, CHC, CHPC, Corridor, Honolulu, HI
Bob Parker, DNP, RN, CENP, CHPN, Interim Healthcare, Lockhart, TX
Mark P. Sharp, CPA, BKD, LLP, Springfield, MO
Even if you’re not actively participating in the Medicare Care Choices model or any of the current bundle programs such as joint replacement or cardiac rehabilitation, it is clear that alternative payment models are your future. Through the use of data, panel discussion and insights from the Centers of Medicare & Medicaid Innovations, this pre-conference session will help hospice and palliative care organizations understand the emerging payment reform landscape, the magnitude of provider opportunities and risks in these payment models, and evaluate potential strategies for leveraging the opportunities and reducing the risks.
Learning Objectives:
  • Gain an understanding of the alternative payment models and increase the knowledge of how these new payment models can impact your organization
  • Identify strategies in using data to build an organization of accountability that fosters collaborative relationships in the payment reform landscape
  • Evaluate potential strategies for leveraging the opportunities and reducing the risks in alternative payment models

CE/CME Credits: Nurse

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